Главная страница


Смотреть ОНЛАЙН

'Half Caste' by John Agard Analysis for GCSE English Literature (Edexcel Conflict Anthology)




Формат Размер Скачать

Информация о видео 'Half Caste' by John Agard Analysis for GCSE English Literature (Edexcel Conflict Anthology)


Название :  'Half Caste' by John Agard Analysis for GCSE English Literature (Edexcel Conflict Anthology)
Продолжительность :   970
Пользователь :  Mary Meredith
Дата публикации :   2015-03-29
Просмотры :   35,460
Понравилось :   154
Не понравилось :   26


Кадры из видео 'Half Caste' by John Agard Analysis for GCSE English Literature (Edexcel Conflict Anthology)






Описание к видео 'Half Caste' by John Agard Analysis for GCSE English Literature (Edexcel Conflict Anthology)

Summary of Key Points
Context
Agard is from Guyana - a former British colony which achieved independence from British rule in 1966. His mother was Portugese and his father Afro-Guyanan. He moved to London in 1977 and was offended by the use of the term 'half-caste'. This poem expresses his feelings about that derisory term.
Structure
The poem is written in free verse - lines are very short as Agard drives home his message.
There is no conventional punctuation - the poem was written to be performed and Agard has said that he likes the idea of readers having control over its pace and rhythm.
Phonetic spelling is a key feature and allows Agard to recreate his Guyanese Creole dialect. A creole is a language which originates from the combination of one or more original languages - it is in fact a rich mix.
There is no formal rhyme scheme but internal rhymes create an energetic, rhythmic quality which captures the Creole dialect.
Point of View
A poem written in the first person, Agard's 'voice' is important. He is asserting his cultural identity, proudly, and addressing a bigot who has evidently labelled him 'half-caste'. "Explain yuself" is a challenge repeated four times in the poem, creating rhetorical force each time its repeated and also functioning like a stanza break - marking a shift.
Use of Language
The poem opens with the speaker ironically referring to himself as standing on one leg, as a half person. This ironic, mocking tone is sustained as the poet asks whether Picasso's paintings should be referred to as half-caste since they mix different colours or Tchaikovsky's symphonies since black and white notes are used.
The references to art connote beauty, depth and interest - suggesting perhaps that Agard sees his mixed race identity in this way. Not as lacking something, as the term 'half-caste' implies.
The poems becomes more bitter as Agard suggests that he will only relate to his listener with half of himself since he is apparently only half of a person. Images of the moon and shadows suggest that this is how he feels he is perceived - as a dark and sinister figure.
In the poems' conclusion, Agard makes the point that the half person is actually the person he is addressing since he, blinded by prejudice, has only half a mind.
He insists that this individual returns when he has been able to open his mind, so that there can be real communication and Agard is able tell his 'whole story' to someone who is really able to listen.
Themes
Prejudice, and the conflict between people this creates.
Cultural identity - Agard is proud of his cultural identity and his language - a joyous, energetic, pulsating Creole, itself a mix of languages and the richer for it.
Strong links with 'No Problem' in the Edexcel Conflict anthology.


Комментарии к видео 'Half Caste' by John Agard Analysis for GCSE English Literature (Edexcel Conflict Anthology)


Нет комментариев для этого видео

Похожие на 'Half Caste' by John Agard Analysis for GCSE English Literature (Edexcel Conflict Anthology) видео